An unexamined faith

“An unexamined faith is not worth having, for it can be true only by accident.”

James Luther Adams

Reason and faith are not polar opposites, nor are they mutually exclusive.

Reason and faith are not in constant battle, though it may often seem that way.

Reason does not have a monopoly on thought. Faith is not the sole province of intuition.

Reason isn’t just about science and law. Faith is not only a religious concept.

Even the most “reasonable” and left-brained among us exhibit plenty of faith.

Don’t believe me? Make a list of the things that you are convinced are true even if there is no objective basis to have that conclusion.

It may be as simple as believing that the Cubs will win the World Series. It may be as complicated as thinking your view of how the universe came to be is the right one.

It may be as deep as your faith that things always happen for a reason. It may be as shallow as your conviction that something you just bought will make you happy.

Reason is not strong. Faith is not weak. They not only can co-exist, they can be mutually reinforcing.

Faith is not the problem. Blind faith is.

When we accept that something is true without a level of true understanding, without discrimination, without going deep into our intentions, we risk making those that believe differently “the other.”

Indeed, we risk making the certitude of our faith a weapon.

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